Events


Supporting Historic High Streets:

Heritage and the Town Centre Experience


New date and venue/ format to be confirmed (originally planned for 24 March 2020, Kellogg College, Oxford)

Tickets £35-155 https://htvf.eventbrite.co.uk

Please email us to find out more about plans to reschedule this event: htf@kellogg.ox.ac.uk


Following our popular seminar series in 2018 and 2019 on Supporting Historic High Streets, this seminar will explore the role of the heritage as a key part of the city or town centre economy and building greater resilience for local high streets.


While the High Street’s battle against out-of-town and online shopping continues, leisure and ‘experiences’ have emerged as its potential saviours, with the capacity to attract and retain new spending in town centres, and adding social benefits, if managed well.There is a risk that a new breed of leisure-based ‘clone towns’ will develop with cafes, bars, restaurants, crazy golf and other activities taking vacant shop units, but looking more locally could provide a more resilient and unique appeal to local residents and visitors alike – understanding our built and social heritage.


We will consider how to celebrate heritage assets and social heritage in town centres not usually thought of for their heritage value; when heritage is ‘at risk’ from neglect or competition from other development pressures; as well as how to bring other activities to centres with less risk. With funding available to support high streets, town centres and tourism, we will also look at what volunteers can do and the role of heritage interpretation to bring the stories to life.


For professional and communities alike, this is an important theme in the debate about future town centres.


Delegates will learn about:

  • High Street Heritage Action Zones and their aims
  • Why telling the story of a place matters for locals and visitors alike
  • Managing a town or city undergoing change and strategies to help
  • Protecting heritage and historic places under pressure from other development
  • Exploring the role of other uses in vacant shop units and city centre buildings to make a change
  • Why Urban Rooms are so useful in building bridges
  • Supporting areas with a low awareness of local heritage assets
  • The role of volunteers in developing local heritage tourism and awareness
  • Understanding heritage interpretation and why it matters.


Detailed programme to be confirmed according to new date(s) and format:


10am

Tea and coffee on arrival

10.30am

Welcome, Louise Thomas, HTVF Director

10.45am

Why High Streets matter and the plans for new Heritage Action Zones, Owain Lloyd James, National Head of Places Strategy, Historic England

11.15am

Sutton High Street – managing heritage pressures, Mandar Puranik, Programme Manager - Area Renewal and Regeneration, London Borough of Sutton

11.45am

Developing Nottingham’s Urban Room, Alice Ullathorne, Heritage Strategy Officer, Nottingham City Council

12.15pm

Q&A

12.45pm

Lunch

1.45pm

The value of capturing places’ stories, Pippa Coutts, Policy and Development Manager, Carnegie UK Trust

2.15pm

Creating opportunities from vacant space, Emily Berwyn, Director, Meanwhile Space

2.45pm

Planning heritage interpretation, Peter Seccombe, Director, Red Kite Environment

3.15pm

Tea and coffee

3.45pm

Volunteer-led case study: Setting up the Penge Heritage Trail, Chris O'Shaughnessy

4.15pm

Progress on the ground: Approaches to effectively managing and enabling change, Will Holborow, Associate & Heritage Team Leader, Purcell

4.45pm

Discussion and Close


This event counts as 6 hours of CPD. Join the HTVF now and save money – see http://www.htvf.org/Join/ for details and www.htvf.org for more details of our work.


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Climate Change and Historic Places

New date and venue/ format to be confirmed (originally planned for Tuesday 31st March 2020, Kellogg College, Oxford)

Tickets £35-155 https://htvf.eventbrite.co.uk

Please email us to find out more about plans to reschedule this event: htf@kellogg.ox.ac.uk

With Heritage Declares calling for action, this seminar will look at climate change and our heritage and its settings. Just as more than 100 local councils in the UK have declared a climate emergency and are looking at what this means for their strategic policies and day-to-day actions, so the heritage sector has a new call for action.


While the inherent sustainability of re-using existing buildings is well-known, how persuasive are we at arguing for their retention in energy terms, or the microclimate of their settings? How we balance adapting historic places to be more environmentally-responsible whilst not harming their historic character is a key challenge.


With low and zero carbon strategies becoming increasingly important not only to places but also to organisations, what are the kind of actions that can be taken - large and small? What role can communities play when setting their own agendas for neighbourhood plans or rescuing historic buildings?


This seminar will address these issues, for professional and communities alike, and will explore the principles of the Heritage Declares charter (www.heritagedeclares.org/):

1. Be a platform for change
2. Shift conservation priorities
3. Build and share the evidence
4. Conserve embodied resources
5. Plan for sustainability
6. Rethink heritage tourism
7. Empower practitioners
8. Protect skills and materials
9. Detoxify conservation practice
10. Pursue ethical finance.


Detailed programme to be confirmed according to new date(s) and format:

10am

Tea and coffee on arrival

10.30am

Welcome, Louise Thomas, HTVF Director

10.45am

Heritage Declares: Why the heritage sector needs to address climate change, Hannah Parham, Associate Director, Donald Insall Associates

11.15am

Old House Eco House: Retrofitting for energy efficiency and sustainability, Marianne Suhr, The Old House Consultancy

11.45am

Understanding embodied energy in existing buildings: Richmond House, Whitehall, Mark Hines, Mark Hines architects

12.15

Q&A

12.45pm

Lunch

1.45pm

Climate change and conservation in neighbourhood planning and community initiatives, Dan Stone, Project Manager, Low Carbon Neighbourhood Planning Programme, Centre for Sustainable Energy

2.15pm

What declaring a climate emergency means for heritage and conservation policies and practice, TBC

2.45pm

Low carbon strategies for historic buildings and areas, Julie Godefroy, Director, Julie Godefroy Sustainability

3.15pm

Tea and coffee

3.45pm

Heritage and conservation policies and practice in a local authority, TBC

4.15pm

Discussion and Close

This event counts as 6 hours of CPD. Join the HTVF now and save money – see http://www.htvf.org/Join/ for details and www.htvf.org for more details of our work. The above image is Richmond House, Whitehall (image by Country Life).

This event has been kindly supported by:


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Heritage Interpretation for Places and Spaces - Workshop

New date and venue/ format to be confirmed (originally planned for Thursday 14th May 2020, Kellogg College, Oxford)

Tickets £35-155 https://htvf.eventbrite.co.uk

Please email us to find out more about plans to reschedule this event: htf@kellogg.ox.ac.uk


Understanding what heritage interpretation can do, how it can work, and how to plan it successfully. Celebrating our heritage assets is a key step in developing a visitor economy, bringing more life to our town centres, encouraging more tourism, but also recognising and promoting local pride.


Exemplary heritage interpretation can be the difference between a place being overlooked and neglected, or it becoming a new attraction and an educational resource for many different people. Capturing history and conveying it to others should be a fundamental part of how we manage changing historic cities, towns, villages, neighbourhoods, streets and buildings.


This workshop will be led by Sarah Oswald, of the Authentic Spark, an experienced heritage interpretation expert and member of the Association of Heritage Interpretation (AHI) and Group for Education in Museums (GEM). We will consider how to celebrate built and social heritage in places and spaces, and those not usually thought of for their heritage value or easily accessible.
For professionals and communities alike, this is an important next step in bringing heritage assets and places alive for visitors and local communities.


Delegates will learn about:

  • undertaking an interpretive audit of existing interpretation
  • an overview of what interpretation is and the principles behind it
  • building an interpretive plan (delegates will be invited to bring information about their own place or project to work on if interested)
  • focusing on who the audience is and setting objectives
  • developing interpretive messages, and
  • choosing the right media to be appropriate to different places, audiences and messages.
OUTLINE PROGRAMME
10am Tea and coffee on arrival
10.30am Welcome, Louise Thomas, HTVF Director
10.45am Workshop Part 1 , Sarah Oswald, the Authentic Spark
12.45pm Lunch
1.30pm Workshop Part 2, Sarah Oswald
4pm Discussion & Close


This event counts as 5 hours of CPD. Save money today by joining the Historic Towns and Villages Forum - see www.htvf.org/Join/ for details!


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